Posts tagged ‘video art’

Meet Diablo

Diablo the anaconda has finally arrived.

He wasn’t thrilled about being moved, and released an indescribable smell to express his displeasure, but he is now safely installed in his enclosure on the third floor, as part of an installation by Juan Downey titled “Anaconda Map of Chile.” It’s an important piece, and it’s never been shown in the U.S. the way the artist intended; because of Downey’s point about the Anaconda Copper Mining Company’s role in the downfall of Salvador Allende and the installation of dictator Augusto Pinochet, the piece was censored more than once.

Diablo, front and center. Photo by Anne Sullivan.

Diablo is a 6-foot Eunectes notaeus (Yellow Anaconda), on loan to the Museum from the Phoenix Herpetological Society, a non-profit reptile education and conservation group. He was rescued by his current owner, Russ Johnson, who is president of the Phoenix Herpetological Society, when he was just about year old. Diablo’s enclosure is heated, and is one-and-a-half times larger than his cage at the Society, giving him more room to stretch out, although he likes to spend most of his time coiled up. During his stay at the Museum, two staff members of the PHS will come regularly to care for him.

Native to tropical South America, anacondas are members of the boa constrictor family and are the largest of the snakes of the Americas. Yellow Anacondas live about 15 to 20 years and grow to be 8 to 12 feet long. Diablo is a young snake, probably 8 or 9 years old, and his diet consists of rats. In the wild, anacondas eat fish, alligators, birds, small deer and large rodents. The anaconda can unhinge its lower jaw, allowing it to swallow animals whole after squeezing them to death with its powerful body.

At the time of his rescue, Diablo belonged to a young man who had purchased him from a local pet store but didn’t know anything about anacondas. Diablo had grown very sick, so someone contacted Russ, who nursed Diablo back to health. It took almost two years. “It was a labor of love,” Russ says.

Now Diablo’s skin is the right color and is iridescent, as it should be. Russ notes that under normal circumstances, people should not own anacondas, but because Diablo was born in captivity, it is against international regulations to release him back into the wild. So Russ will always take care of him.

The museum is grateful to Russ and to the Phoenix Herpetological Society for helping us make sure that Diablo is well cared for during his stay at the ASU Art Museum.

Tonight at 6 p.m., Marilys Belt de Downey, director of the Juan Downey Foundation, will speak with Curator Valerie Smith about her late husband’s work, including “Anaconda Map of Chile,” followed by our Season Opening Reception from 7 to 9 p.m. We hope you’ll come visit Diablo during the course of the season, to see the significant role he plays in the Juan Downey retrospective here at the Museum. If you do, we ask only that you please refrain from touching or tapping on his enclosure. He won’t enjoy that. As a preschool teacher we know tells her students, “Touch with your eyes.”

September 30, 2011 at 10:55 pm 1 comment

Adventures in curating, or “The Invisible Architect”

 

Juan Downey, “Anaconda Map of Chile,” 1973. Photo by Harry Shunk, courtesy of the Juan Downey Foundation.

Just back from a trip to the East Coast to research several upcoming exhibitions and projects. My first stop was the MIT List Visual Art Center to visit the Juan Downey exhibition, The Invisible Architect, which the ASU Art Museum will be presenting this fall. It is a fascinating and complex body of work by a Chilean-born artist who experimented with new technology and its role in our society beginning in the late 1960s. Downey (1940-1993) worked with a number of artists from that period, including Gordon Matta-Clark and Bill Viola, on interactive performances and videos. Much of his early work explored the invisible connections between and among humans, the body and the built environment .

Later he started to explore issues central to his personal history and experiences. In the mid 1970s, he and his family lived for several months with the Yanomami Indians in the Amazon, arriving by canoe with their art materials and video camera. Downey made ironic, pseudo-documentary videos that critiqued Western anthropological approaches.

The sleepers in the exhibition are the beautiful paintings and drawings, many of them maps of the Americas or fantastic architectural structures. The show was featured in Artforum’s summer preview issue; after showing here in Tempe, it will travel to the Bronx Museum.

Ever since my return, I have been working with the rest of the curatorial team to plan for the installation of The Invisible Architect in three of our galleries. We are juggling multiple videos, installations — and an Anaconda.

You never know where curatorial work will take you…more soon.

Heather Sealy Lineberry
Senior Curator and Associate Director,  ASU Art Museum

July 20, 2011 at 11:34 pm

Family So-Much-Fun Day!

Family Fun Day. Photo by Stephen Gittins.

“Okay, I’ll dance to one more song, but then I HAVE to get in line to get my face painted,” said one adorable young girl who was dancing in the gallery with the Zumbatomics participatory activity, led by Melinda Mills-Walkey.

“I want to be KISS,” said one young man as he approached the face painter. His mother explained that he was very interested in becoming a rock star and that she had no idea how he had even found out about KISS, but she saw nothing wrong with it.

Another child suddenly halted working on the art project in front of her when she saw her favorite PBS character, Super Why, and only returned to the table after having her photograph taken with him.

I observed each of these moments at the ASU Art Museum’s Family Fun Day on July 9th, 2011. With hands-on art-making activities, interactive performances and readings and illustration demonstrations by Chris Gall and Alex Rex, everyone at the museum on Saturday had a great day.

This is my fifth year organizing the Family Fun Day with the help of our Windgate Intern, who also curates an exhibition based on a theme, pulling works broadly from our collection.  It’s so rewarding to see the hours put into planning the crafts, contacting performers and working with our fabulous community partners result in such an entertaining day for families. My favorite part of Family Fun Day is that the entire event is free, allowing families to have fun without worrying about how much it costs. This year, more than 1,200 people stopped by to enjoy the four-hour event, and that’s not including visitors to the Ceramics Research Center across the street.

Now we’re putting the supplies away from Saturday’s activities, and starting to prep for next month’s 1st Saturdays for Families (Saturday, Aug. 6 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.), which explores the exhibition By myself and with my friends through an interactive dance led by choreographer Elizabeth Johnson, a special visit from the Arizona Animal Welfare League (and animal friends), and a fun animal-making art craft.

And I also will start planning next year’s Family Fun Day — after I finish recovering from this year’s event.

 –Andrea Feller, Curator of Education

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Photos in the slideshow are by Stephen Gittins and Stu Mitnick.

July 14, 2011 at 7:58 pm

Events at ASU Art Museum, April 2010

Events at Arizona State University Art Museum for April 2010:

April 3: First Saturdays for Families, a free hands-on art project for kids 4-12 and their families. This month’s art project is watercolors! See our blog post for more information.

[EDIT: The list of films to be screened on April 17 is now available on our site!]

April 10: Street Party, at Hoskin Ryan Consultants property, Indian School Rd and 2nd Ave, Phoenix. From 4 – 10 p.m., $5 at the gate or online, and kids 12 and younger are free! Proceeds benefit ASU Art Museum exhibitions and programs.

April 17: ASU Art Museum 14th Annual Short Film & Video Festival, out on the plaza behind the museum. Bring your own chairs and blankets to be comfy for a gorgeous night under the stars watching short films submitted from all over the world. A totally free event!

April 20: Gallery talks by guest curator Bobby Silverman (at the Ceramics Research Center) and artist William Wylie (in the top gallery).

Arizona State University Art Museum is free and open to the public. The main museum is located at the southeast corner of Mill Avenue at 10th Street, in Tempe, Arizona. The ASU Art Museum Ceramics Research Center is just across the street at the northeast corner of Mill Avenue at 10th Street, and free parking for museum visitors is available directly outside in marked spaces. Please visit our web site for hours and current exhibitions and events.

See you in April!

-diane

March 29, 2010 at 5:06 pm 1 comment

our next First Saturdays for Families project

watercolor project at ASU Art Museum First Saturdays

watercolor painting by our talented Education Assistant Teresa

April is quickly approaching and we still have lots going on at ASU Art Museum!

First Saturdays for Families is Saturday, April 3, from 11 a.m. – 3 p.m.  This month we’re playing with watercolors – what a fun spring project!

And don’t forget about the second annual Street Party coming up on Saturday, April 10! This year’s event will be at the Hoskin Ryan property, on Indian School and 2nd Ave. in Phoenix, from 4 – 10 p.m.  I’ll post more about that soon, but in the meantime, you can get tickets on our site.

If that’s not enough for you, the 14th Annual Short Film & Video Festival is screening on the back plaza Saturday, April 17! Bring out your stadium chairs, blankets and anything else to get comfy for a night out under the stars and some great short films. As soon as our web page is up with the official selections I’ll post again with more information on what you’ll see that night.

And hey- we’re on Yelp! If you’re on Yelp and have been to the museum or any of our events, tell us what you think! We’d love to hear your feedback and your suggestions to keep making our events even better for you.

-diane

March 22, 2010 at 8:20 pm 1 comment

Top 3 Things to Do at ASU Art Museum, March 2010

While it may seem that Dawn is taking over our blog, and we’re ok with that, she has some fun stuff to share with you from the museum for this month:

First Saturdays for Families, March 6, 11 a.m. – 3 p.m.
– kids ages 4-12 and their families can make free art projects based on an artist currently showing in the museum. All materials are supplied free at the museum, and kids get to keep their art. No registration is required – just show up any time during the posted hours.

make clay sculptures based on artist Wanxin Zhang's work, March 6

make clay sculptures based on artist Wanxin Zhang's work, March 6

(I just really like this little guy, made by Teresa in our education department.)

Forged Power: Ferran Mendoza, Alvaro Sau and William Wylie (through May 29)
– video art exhibition that focuses on people at work. *Note: there are a few scenes that may be inappropriate for younger kids.

Ceram-a-Rama: a *really progressive clay affair (March 4 – 7)
– There’s still time to get tickets to the weekend’s ceramic art events – just go to http://ASUArtMuseum.asu.edu.
If you can’t make the whole weekend, join us just Saturday night on the rooftop of the W Hotel in Scottsdale for our very swank after-party. Tickets for the party are only $25 at the door!

March 1, 2010 at 8:36 pm 1 comment

Sundance ♥s ASU Art Museum

Some exciting 2010 Sundance Film Festival connections for the Arizona State University Art Museum we knew you would enjoy…

Phoenix based artist/videomaker Matthew Moore’s work is selected as part of the Official 2010 Sundance New Frontiers program to take place during this year’s festival.

You will remember Moore’s farm installation and photo works from the 2006 exhibition New American City: Artists Look Forward.  He will be doing a major video art installation at a supermarket in Park City.  Here is a link:

Sundance Link

ASU Art Museum Project Link

Michael Mohan, a filmmaker from our 2008 ASU Art Museum Short Film and Video Festival and whose work The Interrogation appeared in the recent I’m Keeping an Eye on You group video exhibition at the Museum, has his newest film One Too Many Mornings as an Official Selection for the 2010 Sundance Film Festival.

Sundance Link

ASU Art Museum Project Link

ASU Art Museum 2008 Short Film and Video Festival

Shirin Neshat’s Women Without Men, which won her the Silver Lion for best director at the 66th Venice Film Festival in 2009 and was screened for the very first time publically as an early edit version in November of 2007 when the artist presented a lecture at ASU Art Museum, is an Official Sundance Selection this year.  The artist had a major solo exhibition at the ASU Art Museum in 2001:

Sundance Link

ASU Art Museum Project Link

Pipilotti Rist’s Lobe of Lung (The Saliva Ooze Away to the Underground) will be included in the Sundance New Frontiers program.  Her work was presented in a solo exhibition at the ASU Art Museum in 2002:

Sundance Link

ASU Art Museum Project Link

Congratulations to all of our ASU Art Museum friends!

Who’ll be next? Join us on the plaza for the 14th Annual Short Film & Video Festival on April 17!

– Curator John and diane

January 14, 2010 at 11:37 pm

ASU Art Museum ♥s Video Art

Annual Short Film & Video Festival on ASU Art Museum plaza!

Annual Short Film & Video Festival on ASU Art Museum plaza!

Ah, I love the museum in the spring. The students are coming back with new excitement after the holiday break, the weather outside is perfect, the exhibitions at the museum are world-class (as always) and we have great annual events coming up soon!

This season is especially great for us video fans (of which I am one!):

  • We have video art as part of the new exhibition Altered States: Paintings by Gordon Cheung, opening Jan. 9.  Four of his new pieces, to be exact.
  • We’ll be screening Mel Chin’s award-winning video work 9-11/9-11 on Feb. 2 – look for details shortly! (I was watching a bit of this earlier – it’s like an animated graphic novel and very cool.)
  • There’s a full-on video exhibition opening Feb. 20 called Forged Power: Ferran Mendoza, Alvaro Sau and William Wylie – this will be open through May 29.
  • And wrapping it up (at least for the spring season) on April 17, the 14th Annual Short Film and Video Festival! You don’t want to miss this great evening out on the plaza behind the museum – we screen the selected films out on the back wall of the museum. Bring a chair for a really fun night out under the stars. And IT’S FREE.

Speaking of the Film Festival, this is your reminder that your deadline for submissions is Feb. 5! Check out our web site for details on how and where to send your short film for consideration into our juried festival. There’s no cost to submit your film.

Of course, we have way more going on this season than just video art. First Saturdays for Families is in full swing starting Feb. 6; the Ceramics Research Center’s studio tour weekend is Feb. 27-28 and Ceram-A-Rama is March 4-7; back by popular demand, the 2nd annual Street Party is planned for April 10 (watch this blog for more details to come!) and of course, great exhibitions year-round. (I’m really looking forward to seeing Wanxin Zhang’s Ten Year Survey exhibition).

We have a very busy spring season planned and hope you’ll join us for the fun, and the art!

-diane

January 8, 2010 at 6:52 pm

Altered States

Altered States, Jan 9 - April 10, 2010 at ASU Art Museum

We’re getting ready to open our next exhibition, Altered States: Paintings by Gordon Cheung from the Stéphane Janssen Collection. Cheung does really unique and intriguing paintings and I’m looking forward to seeing the work in person.

We’re also fortunate enough to have some of the artist’s video work as well. (And for us video art fans, this will be a great segue into the 14th Annual Short Film & Video Festival scheduled for April 17!) You’ll find four monitors in the back of his gallery included in this exhibition. We hope you’ll join us for this, Cheung’s first solo exhibition in a U.S. museum.

The artist will also be here this month! Come talk with him at a free event on Friday, January 22, at 11 a.m.

In case the graphic is hard to read, here are the details:

Altered States: Paintings by Gordon Cheung from the Stéphane Janssen Collection

Jan. 9 – April 10, 2010 at ASU Art Museum

Season Reception: Feb. 19, 7-9 p.m.

ASU Art Museum is always free and open to the public (even our Season Receptions!) We look forward to seeing you in the galleries!

-diane

January 5, 2010 at 4:09 pm

zombies are never really gone…

Come to ASU Art Museum tonight – Friday the 13th – for the premiere screening of artist-in-residence and master vampire slayer Jillian Mcdonald’s exhibition project.

The goodbye party is 5:30 – 7pm in the first floor gallery of the museum. Jillian leaves us for home tomorrow so come and help us see her off!

-diane

*The video above, which we’ve titled The Undeath of John Spiak, was an elementary art class project – the kids did their own makeup and their own short film while they were here earlier this week. Is that a cool class or what?

November 13, 2009 at 5:59 pm

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