Posts tagged ‘Anila Rubiku’

Recent NY Times article recognizes social practice art – something we know a thing or two about!

Last week in The New York Times, Randy Kennedy, arts writer, took a look at something the ASU Art Museum has been thinking about for many years: socially engaged practice.

In an article entitled “Outside the Citadel, Social Practice Art Is Intended to Nurture,” Kennedy examines the history and current exploration of social practice, whose “practitioners freely blur the lines among object making, performance, political activism, community organizing, environmentalism and investigative journalism, creating a deeply participatory art that often flourishes outside the gallery and museum system.”

“Leading museums have largely ignored it,” Kennedy writes, “But many smaller art institutions see it as a new frontier for a movement whose roots stretch back to the 1960s but has picked up fervor through Occupy Wall Street and the rise of social activism among young artists.” He highlighted museums such as the Hammer Museum, the Walker Art Center, and the Queens Museum of Art, all of which are working to extend their reach in the socially engaged practice sphere.

ASU Art Museum has been focused on socially engaged practice for more than 5 years, with the launch of our Social Studies initiative in 2007, which provides opportunities for artists working in various media to interact creatively and collaboratively with students, other artists, and faculty and community members. The social interaction of the museum-as-artist’s-studio setting encourages participants to explore new avenues of creativity and ultimately enhance their understanding of their world and each other.

The museum has hosted several social practice artists to date as part of the Social Studies initiative, including Jarbas Lopes, Anila Rubiku, Jillian MacDonald, Gregory Sale, Jennifer Nelson and Julianne Swartz, among others.  In 2012, the museum launched a new social practice speaker series as part of the Socially Engaged Practice Initiative at the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts, and welcomed artist and dancer Elizabeth Johnson as the new Coordinator for Socially Engaged Practice for the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts. Johnson is building a socially engaged practice certificate/focus at HIDA, and is housed at the ASU Art Museum  because of the museum’s work in this area.

Finger Dance between mothers and daughters

Above: Elizabeth Johnson, second from left, takes part in the “Mother-Daughter Distance Dance” at the ASU Art Museum on April 2, 2011, as part of Gregory Sale’s exhibition It’s not just black and white.

If you’re curious about the history of the museum’s dedication to socially-engaged practice, take a look back at some of our blog posts showcasing the art and artists we’ve had the pleasure of working with: https://asuartmuseum.wordpress.com/category/social-studies-collaborative-projects/

For Kennedy’s full New York Times piece, visit: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/24/arts/design/outside-the-citadel-social-practice-art-is-intended-to-nurture.html

–Juno Schaser, PR Intern

March 28, 2013 at 8:55 pm Leave a comment

ASU ART MUSEUM and ECHO present A Fluid Resilience, at 54th VENICE BIENNALE

Jananne Al-Ani, Shadow Sites II (detail), 2011. Courtesy the Artist and Abraaj Capital Art Prize 2011. Photograph Adrian Warren.

The ASU ART MUSEUM and ECHO present A Fluid Resilience, a panel at the VENICE BIENNALE through the Pavilion of Iraq. Panelists include artist Jananne Al-Ani, engineer Azzam Alwash, ASU Art Museum Director Gordon Knox, ASU Museum Studies Director Richard Toon, and Sander van der Leeuw, director of the ASU School of Human Evolution and Social Change and the dean of the ASU School of Sustainability.

Anila Rubiku in ASU Art Museum Americas Gallery

We are also pleased to let you know that Anila Rubiku, who was our third artist involved in our Social Studies initiative of social practice residency/exhibitions (2008), will be included in the group exhibition Geopathiesat the Albanian Pavilion during the Biennale. The exhibition, curated by Riccardo Caldura, includes artists Anila Rubiku, Orion Shima, Gentian Shkurti, Eltjon Valle and Driant Zeneli.

image credit: Bill Viola: Buried Secrets, The Greeting, 1995, video sound installation, production still, photo: Kira Perov. Image courtesy of Bill Viola Studio.

The ASU Art Museum has a history with the Venice Biennale, representing the US at the 1995 Biennale with the five room video/sound installation Buried Secrets by artist Bill Viola.

May 18, 2011 at 11:51 pm

One Night Only by Anila Rubiku

Thank you to all that joined us at Taliesin West Friday evening for the amazing US premiere of Anila Rubiku’s video installation One Night Only.  It was a fanastic evening!  For those of you who couldn’t join us, here are a few images from the event…

installation in progress

installation in progress

Anila Rubiku One Night Only installation in progress

Anila Rubiku One Night Only installation in progressDetail Installation View

detail installation view

detail installation view

Individuals viewing Anila Rubiku's One Night Only video installation

Individuals viewing Anila Rubiku

Individuals enjoying the event of Anila Rubiku's One Night Only

Individuals enjoying the event of Anila Rubiku

Installation view of Anila Rubiku's One Night Only

Installation view of Anila Rubiku

Installation view of One Night Only, Anila Rubiku's installation at Taliesin West

Installation view of One Night Only, Anila Rubiku

November 17, 2008 at 4:51 pm

Please join the ASU Art Museum for a very special evening

Friday, November 14 from 7 – 9 pm

at Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin West

CEC ArtsLink artist in residence Anila Rubiku presents the US Premiere of her video installation One Night Only

 

The event is presented by Arizona State University Art Museum through an ongoing relationship with Taliesin West, Frank Lloyd Wright’s national historic landmark home and studio in Scottsdale.

 

Note: Rubiku’s works are recommended for mature audiences; the viewing at Taliesin West is free but does not include tours of the facility.

 

One Night Only – Anila Rubiku

November 14, 2008, from 7pm – 9pm

Taliesin West

12621 N. Frank Lloyd Wright Blvd.

at Cactus Rd.

 

 

You can also join the artist in her collaborative community project in the ASU Art Museum Americas Gallery during the following hours:

Wednesday – Friday, 1-4pm through November 14 

Images of the collaboration in progress can be found on the ASU Art Museum blog!

MORE INFORMATION REGARDING THE PROJECT AND RESIDENCY:

 ASU Art Museum is excited to have CEC Artslink Fellow artist Anila Rubiku currently in residence. Rubiku, often with assistance from members from local communities, works primarily with sewn paper and large-scale structures that depict the human body and explore urban architectural spaces. She has shown her work throughout Europe, Asia, the Middle East and in the U.S., and has done numerous collaborative community projects around the world with diverse groups that include Ethiopian women in Tel Aviv and students of the Design & Architecture University in Taipei. Rubiku is interested in bringing knowledge of American art and architectural centers and community organization practices back to Albania to inform an urban revitalization project she will undertake with architectural students from Tirana University.

Rubiku’s current project at ASU Art Museum is a story told in stitched leather. Each individually stitched section will be joined together to form a large wall-sized work. “The pieces come together to tell a story,” explains Rubiku. “This is how I see Arizona; it’s so large and growing so much. This is because of the human element; we build houses because families need them. As families grow our urban development also must grow with them. This story is also formed by the desert, and the shapes and elements of the desert become a sort of erotic and humorous symbol for procreation and growth in both the human sense and with respect to urban building.”

Rubiku is also pleased to announce the U.S. premiere of her video installation at Taliesin West, Frank Lloyd Wright’s national historic landmark home and studio in Scottsdale, in a collaboration with ASU Art Museum, on November 14, 2008, from 7pm – 9pm. Titled One Night Only, the video installation continues the artist’s conversation on urban and human development. “Both the Museum work and the video installation are about architecture,” says Rubiku. “People make families and initially start a city because they need someplace for their families. As the cities grow they start becoming more planned, but they are still planned in response to human needs. These two different media are just two different ways of exploring this same theme.” 

One Night Only includes a paper construction of the most rapidly growing cities of the last ten years with video projection, and has been shown before only in Tel Aviv. Rubiku’s works are recommended for mature audiences; the viewing at Taliesin West is free but does not include tours of the facility. Taliesin West is located at 12621 N. Frank Lloyd Wright Blvd. at Cactus Rd. For information about tours call 480-680-2700 ext. 494.

As part of its mission as a university museum, ASU Art Museum is committed to showing artists’ work first and is proud to offer artists the opportunity to grow creatively and experiment with new forms. The Social Studies initiative provides opportunities for artists working in various media to interact creatively and collaboratively with students, other artists, faculty and community members. The social interaction of the Museum-as-artist’s-studio setting encourages participants to explore new avenues of creativity and ultimately enhance their understanding of their world and each other.

Acknowledgement:

ArtsLink Fellow Anila Rubiku’s residency is generously funded by CEC ArtsLink, NY. Click here for additional information regarding CEC ArtsLink.

The ASU Art Museum would like to acknowledge the following for their additional in-kind assistance with the residency: Taliesin West; Comfort Inn of Tempe; Tempe Convention and Visitors Bureau; Moroso.

 

 

Arizona State University Art Museum

Tenth Street and Mill Avenue

Tempe, AZ 85287-2911

t. 480.965.2787

 

“For all that’s been said about how behind-the-times academia can be, university galleries are very often the most risk-taking portholes to contemporary art. This fact is exemplified by Arizona State University Art Museum… has demonstrated a keen eye and clear commitment to emerging artists and emergent media.”

– Rhizome (April, 2008)

November 10, 2008 at 6:30 pm

student perspective

Check out ASU Grad Student Lynette A.’s blog and her experience working with Anila Rubiku!

Come and be a creative force in the Museum – work with Anila on this community project! Stop by Tuesday – Friday in the Americas Gallery on the second floor.

We would also like to thank Moroso for providing the leather on which Anila’s story is being sewn.  

-Diane

October 30, 2008 at 7:03 pm

Anila Rubiku – Collaborative Project in Progress

Set-up

Set-up Day 1

 

Day 2

Day 2

A few progress report images as CEC ArtsLink Fellow Artist in Residence Anila Rubiku collaborates with members of the Arizona State University Art Museum community. 
– Curator John

October 29, 2008 at 11:12 pm

My first day working inside the ASU Art museum, with a group of people.

an european artist in Tempe Arizona!!!!!!

sometimes, things change

 and big changes are most of the time are for the best.

 

Gosh it’s really great. 

At the beginning I though oh where and what is this city for… so BIG, 

huge cars,  what do they need them for?

the sun that is so strong and oh Gosh the heat…

so I still ask myself many things I see here and don’t understand.

But here I am,

after a week and I really like it. Like the creasines of this big spaces, a kind of free spirit that we european always speak.

 Thinking big and doing big. 

Well nowdays thinking big and doing big is not the same but once a while here it can happen.

 

Yesterday was my first day working inside the ASU Art Museum, 

me and the others are producing an art work into a museum gallery.

It makes me feel special. 

Yes!

The museums are made for showing an art work but not for producing an art work.

Not a Lab or a studio!

So this is what I like the most here. 

Changes, changing ways of doing, sometimes my attitude.

And maybe showing after this work out not into a museum.

 Il contenuto e il contenitore is the base of this change.

Well girls thank you very much for coming and collaborating at my projects.

Thank you for helping me

Let see what and who is coming today. 

I know that the best has yet to come…

Dreaming how this work is going to be!!!

 -Anila Rubiku

October 29, 2008 at 4:05 pm


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