Posts filed under ‘Family Exhibition & Fun Day’

Evolving Interpretations of Family in ‘Family Matters’

“Like mother, like daughter.” I’m sure most of us have heard this saying before and even I tend to use it extensively to describe the profound impact that my mother has had on me. In looking around the Family Matters exhibition at the ASU Art Museum, on view now through Aug. 1, 2015, I see that I am not the only person who shares this sentiment. In many ways, the things that we learn from our parents leave a lasting impression on us and the things that we hold important in our lives. From being taught manners at the dinner table or inheriting a profound strength from a lost relative, the past struggles and lessons that prior generations leave behind surround the things that we value in our lives.

Photo May 11, 12 21 09 PM

In the exhibition, in a work by artist June Mayer, Leaving 1907 (Plate 1, the Dorothy Series), the artist references her mother’s strength. After her mother, Dorothy Kline, passed away, Mayer produced a portfolio of prints entitled The Dorothy Series that told her mother’s life story. Mayer is a printer and founder of Tamarind Lithography Workshop that first opened in Los Angeles and is now based in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The work featured in the exhibition shows a print of her mother and her family leaving their home country for America — a difficult feat. The artist breaks barriers on her own as a woman artist pioneering in her medium and with her business; much like her mother did in traveling to America.

June Wayne,

June Wayne, “Leaving 1907 (plate 1, the ‘Dorothy Series’), 1976. (detail) Lithograph, 12 1/4 x 16 7/8 in. From the ASU Art Museum permanent collection, gift of Dr. & Mrs. Malcolm Dorfman.

Another standout work is a print by Miguel Palma, Untitled (Neil Armstrong), which touches on some different, but important family matters. The print features a photograph of Neil Armstrong and his family from an old magazine. The baby in the picture was cut away from the rest of the family and placed above, as a sort of tribute to the next generation of space explorers. The print was also designed in response to the jump by Felix Baumgartner in October 2012, as a tribute to human endurance. Outfitted in a specially designed space suit, Baumgartner jumped out of a space capsule at 24 miles above the earth, diving back down to earth at speeds up to 800 miles-per-hour, breaking the sound barrier. The print was created while Palma was an artist-in-residence with the ASU Art Museum, participating in a Desert Initiative project and creating work for his exhibition that was held at the museum in 2012. Palma was interested in “the history of Manifest Destiny and colonialism in populated places, strategies of adaptation and the role of technology in desert survival” as well as the “decreasing terrestrial exploration and increasing extraterrestrial exploration.” This print was one from a monoprint series through which Palma probed these concerns and celebrated the beginning of the space exploration.

Miguel Palma,

Miguel Palma, “Untitled (Neil Armstrong),” 2012. Monotype, collage, 22 1/2 x 30 1/4 in. From the ASU Art Museum permanent collection; acquired through the Desert Initiative Monoprint Project sponsored by Eddie Shea and Ridge Smidt.

While this may seem like it relates more to science than to family, this print touches on the idea of consecutive generations either equaling or surpassing their successor’s feats and accomplishments. Neil Armstrong was at the frontier of space exploration in his day when he took the first steps on the moon. While walking on the moon is still a huge step in extraterrestrial history, breaking the sound barrier while falling 24 miles back to earth definitely has its own place in the history of the exploration of space and human limitations. While the two men were not family, Palma decides to feature them in the same print to attest to the idea of them as two different generations of explorers with one building off the advances and accomplishments of the other.

Miguel Palma,

Miguel Palma, “Untitled (Neil Armstrong),” 2012. (detail) Monotype, collage, 22 1/2 x 30 1/4 in. From the ASU Art Museum permanent collection; acquired through the Desert Initiative Monoprint Project sponsored by Eddie Shea and Ridge Smidt.

The same theme is present in other works in the exhibition, as well. Like Father, Like Son by Patti Warashina is one example. In this case, what the new generation inherits is physical characteristics. The piece was created after the birth of the artist’s grandson and represents the discussions surrounding a child’s birth about which parent the child resembles, a discussion that many families today like to have. It also attests to those things we receive from our parents and grandparents that we may not necessarily have control over.

Patti Warashina,

Patti Warashina, “Like Father, Like Son,” 2000. (detail) Ceramic, 68 x 16 3/4 x 12 1/2 in. From the ASU Art Museum permanent collection, gift of Sara and David Lieberman.

The exhibition Family Matters features work that seeks to bring to light the evolving interpretations of family and the things that matter to them. It has also brought to light where we receive these values from and why. This collection of works speaks to what type of impacts the past generations have upon us. Families can make all the difference in who we choose to become or what we choose to do, but chances are with the advancements and new things that time brings, it’s never exactly the same and cannot always be controlled. However, these effects are important in the present and will continue to be important in the future. Family truly does matter, even when they aren’t around anymore.

— Hannah Weston, Public Relations and Marketing Intern

Family Matters is on view through Aug. 1, 2015 in the lower level galleries at the ASU Art Museum. The exhibition is supported by the Evelyn Smith Exhibition Fund, members of the ASU Art Museum and the Stulgaitis Family Scholastic Award in honor of Helen Flecha Polina.

All photos by Hannah Weston. 

June 1, 2015 at 8:53 pm Leave a comment

Family So-Much-Fun Day!

Family Fun Day. Photo by Stephen Gittins.

“Okay, I’ll dance to one more song, but then I HAVE to get in line to get my face painted,” said one adorable young girl who was dancing in the gallery with the Zumbatomics participatory activity, led by Melinda Mills-Walkey.

“I want to be KISS,” said one young man as he approached the face painter. His mother explained that he was very interested in becoming a rock star and that she had no idea how he had even found out about KISS, but she saw nothing wrong with it.

Another child suddenly halted working on the art project in front of her when she saw her favorite PBS character, Super Why, and only returned to the table after having her photograph taken with him.

I observed each of these moments at the ASU Art Museum’s Family Fun Day on July 9th, 2011. With hands-on art-making activities, interactive performances and readings and illustration demonstrations by Chris Gall and Alex Rex, everyone at the museum on Saturday had a great day.

This is my fifth year organizing the Family Fun Day with the help of our Windgate Intern, who also curates an exhibition based on a theme, pulling works broadly from our collection.  It’s so rewarding to see the hours put into planning the crafts, contacting performers and working with our fabulous community partners result in such an entertaining day for families. My favorite part of Family Fun Day is that the entire event is free, allowing families to have fun without worrying about how much it costs. This year, more than 1,200 people stopped by to enjoy the four-hour event, and that’s not including visitors to the Ceramics Research Center across the street.

Now we’re putting the supplies away from Saturday’s activities, and starting to prep for next month’s 1st Saturdays for Families (Saturday, Aug. 6 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.), which explores the exhibition By myself and with my friends through an interactive dance led by choreographer Elizabeth Johnson, a special visit from the Arizona Animal Welfare League (and animal friends), and a fun animal-making art craft.

And I also will start planning next year’s Family Fun Day — after I finish recovering from this year’s event.

 –Andrea Feller, Curator of Education

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Photos in the slideshow are by Stephen Gittins and Stu Mitnick.

July 14, 2011 at 7:58 pm

By myself and with my friends… July 2 – August 27 @ ASU Art Museum

By myself and with my friends…
July 2 – August  27, 2011

Krista Birnbaum (Houston)
Donna Conlon (Panama City)
Rivane Neuenschwander and Sergio Neuenschwander (Belo Horizonte / Frankfurt)
Connie Samaras (Los Angeles)
Corinna Schnitt (Hamburg)

We spend time by ourselves; we spend time with others. We are aware that these two circumstances differ greatly.

Time alone can be a period of comfort and reflection — or of nervousness and despair. It can be a time of rejuvenating our bodies, peaceful silences, an opportunity to become one with ourselves or perhaps engage in an act of individual creativity. But alone time can also be filled with boredom, fidgetiness and a restless mind that wanders in uncomfortable directions.

On the other hand, when we are with others, we can be influenced by peers to participate in activities we would never consider as individuals. Ordinary people can gain empowerment by acting collectively, with both positive and negative results. Looking no further than recent headlines, we can see examples of different kinds of group behavior – from post-sports-championship rioting to the anti-government protests occurring throughout the Middle East and Europe.

In By myself and with my friends . . . six artists explore the complexities of human nature by looking at some of the things we have in common with other living creatures, from our herd mentality to our moments of solace. The exhibition provides an opportunity for reflection, a time to examine and reconsider our own behaviors, to slow down and breathe. It is a chance to realize that even when we are alone, we are all in this together.

Featured videos include work by Krista Birnbaum, Donna Conlon, Rivane Neuenschwander and Sergio Neuenschwander, Corinna Schnitt and Connie Samaras.

Curated by John D. Spiak, ASU Art Museum, this project is generously made possible by the Everlyn Smith Family Exhibition Fund and Friends of the Arizona State University Art Museum.

COMPLETE EXHIBITION CHECKLIST:


Krista Birnbaum
Constance, 2006
running time: 3:00min
DVD
Courtesy of the artist.


Donna Conlon
Coexistence, 2003
running time: 5:26min
DVD
Courtesy of the artist.


Rivane Neuenschwander and Sergio Neuenschwander
Sunday, 2010
running time: 5:17min
DVD
Courtesy of the artists and Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York.


Connie Samaras
Untitled (Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica), 2005
running time: 4:30min
DVD
Courtesy of the artist.


Corinna Schnitt
Once upon a time, 2005
running time: 25:07min
DVD
Courtesy of the artist.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

June 24, 2011 at 5:04 pm 1 comment

upcoming

So, I’ve been doing quite a lot of editing, calendar posting and other things to start getting our future exhibitions  lined up, and I have to say, we have some really cool stuff coming! At the risk of stealing a little thunder, I’m gonna share a few:

Family exhibition What Moves Us: Art of Transportation, summer 2010 at ASU Art Museum

What Moves Us: Art of Transportation, summer 2010

This is a piece from our summer family exhibition titled What Moves Us: Art of Transportation. Fun! This is in two galleries starting May 29. (Hover on the photo for credits.)

Lasting Impressions: Japanese Prints from the ASU Art Museum Collection, fall 2010

Lasting Impressions: Japanese Prints from the ASU Art Museum Collection

I can’t wait to see this exhibition, Lasting Impressions. I’ve seen some of the prints and they’re really amazing.  Aug. 28 – Nov. 27 – that means if you’re coming to our Welcome Back Student Party on Aug. 31, you’ll get to see this!

Check out our web site for more information on all of our exhibitions and events. There’s always something going on at the museum!

-diane

March 26, 2010 at 12:01 am

Family Fun Day is coming Saturday July 11!

You're Invited! Family Fun Day is on July 11, 10a.m. - 2p.m. FREE!

You're Invited! Family Fun Day is on July 11, 10a.m. - 2p.m. FREE!

July 1, 2009 at 4:45 pm

ribbit. First Saturdays for Families. ribbit.

June's First Saturdays art project: frogs!

June's First Saturdays art project: frogs!

Our curator of education, Andrea, came to me today with this: the next First Saturdays for Families art project! It’s based on the ceramic art of David Gilhooly, who uses a lot of frogs in his work. See the work in our Summer Family exhibition, Food: Feast for the Eyes, which is now open, and make your own paper plate frogs!

ASU Art Museum is always free and open to the public! There’s no cost to participate in our event and kids get to keep their art projects. Perfect for kids 4-12 and their families, and no registration is required. Just stop by the museum any time between 10am – 3pm on the first Saturday of the month!

-diane

May 28, 2009 at 6:51 pm

ASU Art Museum: conquering summer boredom!

Family Exhibition and Family Fun Day 2009 at ASU Art Museum

Family Exhibition and Family Fun Day 2009 at ASU Art Museum

Where can you bring the kids this summer that’s fun, indoors, and isn’t going to cost you an arm and a leg?

Come to ASU Art Museum! The museum is always free and open to the public, and our annual summer family exhibition is getting ready to open next Saturday, May 16. There’s even free parking (on the northeast corner of Mill Avenue and 10th Street, just outside of our Ceramics Research Center). So you can afford to bring the kids and spend a day learning about and having fun with art.

We also have some great, FREE, family activities coming up in addition to the exhibition:

Saturday, June 6 and Saturday, August 1, join us for First Saturdays for Families. It actually happens the first Saturday of each month here in the museum. We offer hands-on activities that are perfect for kids 4-12 and totally free! No registration is required and all materials are provided free at the museum. And kids can keep their art projects, too. It’s a great way to get creative and have fun for a day!

July is special: the first Saturday is a holiday so the museum is closed, but the *second* Saturday is Family Fun Day! July 11, from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m., join us for hands-on activities, puppet show, an appearance by a KAET/Eight character, a reading area and great food-related information and art to go along with our family exhibition. All activities are free and there is no admission fee at ASU Art Museum. This is a really fun event that you won’t want to miss!

Family Fun Day is only once a year, but First Saturdays for Families is a monthly program, so mark your calendars and come on over. Don’t be bored this summer!

-diane

May 7, 2009 at 7:59 pm


November 2021
M T W T F S S
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930  

Follow us on Twitter!

ASU Ceramics Research Center Library