Pictures of Cockatoo Island

May 15, 2010 at 11:49 pm

Cockatoo Island is a book all by itself. It sits in Sydney’s Harbour, about a 20 minute ferry ride from the Circular Quay. (Side note: the ferry is free, as is the entire Biennale. Mind blowing.) I’ll take the cheater’s way out here and quote Wikipedia for the factual stuff, the crux of which is this: “Cockatoo Island is a former imperial prison, industrial school, reformatory and gaol. It was also the site of one of Australia’s biggest shipyards during the twentieth century.” Here’s the URL for further reading (as you may have noticed, I have yet to master the trick of making a URL a live link on this blog, and since I am my own tech support, this is as good as it gets. If I could, I would fire me as tech support. Instead, I just shake my head at myself and mutter darkly.)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cockatoo_Island_(New_South_Wales)

A telling note from the Biennale (free) guide about “Safety on the Island”: “We ask that you mind your step and beware of hazards. Please do not walk backwards — there are occasional uneven surfaces, voids, trip hazards and cliffs.”

Here’s what the island looks like as you approach by ferry:

And here is some of what there is to see on the island:

From the top: Artist Cai Guo-Qiang and “Inopportune: Stage One”; Peter Hennessey’s “My Hubble (the universe turned in on itself)”; Fiona Foley’s “Bearing Witness”; artist and Biennale keynote speaker Hiroshi Sugimoto in the Power House, where his “Lightning Fields” is installed; a visitor takes in a sculpture in Rodney Glick’s “Everyone” series; Isaac Julien’s video installation”Ten Thousand Waves”; Serge Spitzer’s “Molecular; walking from site to site on the island; and finally, the snack I chose from the Cockatoo Island snack bar (delicious).

– Deborah Sussman Susser

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Entry filed under: Uncategorized.

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